The Unkindest Cut of All

Parusharam's 'spot'

The water has run cold. He doesn’t remember how long ago he had stepped into the shower. Has it been an hour? Or two? His father should be coming home soon.

When he had turned on the water, it had been warm, even scalding, but now it is icy. It raises gooseflesh on his arms, but he can’t leave yet.

Not until he is clean again.

Out, damned spot.

He nearly giggles. The irony is not lost on him. He has always hated Shakespeare, ever since his school days – not for his prose, which was sparkling and absorbing and delicate and beautiful – but because of the idiots who liked to quote Shakespeare without understanding one whit of it, all the while thinking they sounded like geniuses.

Today, though, as he had watched the water run red down the drain, he had felt a kinship with Lady Macbeth.

And wouldn’t his brothers just love that? That he identified more with a woman than a man…if he closed his eyes, he could still hear their voices; ‘Sitting out again, Faggy?’ ‘Of course you wouldn’t like sports, would you, Faggy?’

They’d always thought him different, because he was intelligent, because he preferred to read and play the violin or even just sit quietly and think rather running after a ball like a dog—

There is a clatter, and he realises he has dropped the knife. He hadn’t even realised he had stepped into the shower still clutching it.

He picks it up, and runs a hand along the edge. It’s clean, now, there’s no trace of the violence the knife has just seen. It doesn’t look sharp. Hard to believe this blade had drawn so much blood…welling up from her stomach, where he had stabbed her first, then her arms, where he had slashed her when she had tried to push him away…

Want to read more?
Order the Dark Things anthology and read the full story!

Featuring cross-dressing assassins, were-snakes, gods and goddesses, demonesses and asura kings, Dark Things Between the Shadow and the Soul retells age-old tales from Indian mythology—with a twist. Rearranging myth and legend to create new plots, these short stories will delight lovers of the unusual.

______________

Image, with thanks, from Free Digital Photos

[mood|short stories indian mythology tired]
[music| Turning Tables: Adele]

(Visited 56 times, 1 visits today)

4 Comment

  1. bazarov says: Reply

    I don’t like the story in itself but you were able to tell it pretty well… so, thumbs up…!!

    1. SSK says: Reply

      Hmm. Not liking the story – is it an emotional reaction to the matricide, or you didn’t like the plot itself?

      I’m glad you thought I could tell something you didn’t even like pretty well. Thanks! =)

      1. bazarov says: Reply

        an emotional reaction to the matricide? YES…

        1. SSK says: Reply

          Hmm. I meant in the sense – it’s not that the story itself was bad (or badly told), it’s just that it made you feel bad, correct? (In which case, I call it a win, because it was meant to do that.)

Leave a comment - I'd love to hear what you think!

%d bloggers like this: